We use our own and third-party cookies to optimize your experience on this site, including to maintain user sessions. Without these cookies our site will not function well. If you continue browsing our site we take that to mean that you understand and accept how we use the cookies. If you wish to decline our cookies we will redirect you to Google.
Already have an account? Sign in.

 Remember Me | Forgot Your Password?
<<78910111213141516>> Total results:1874 References Per Page:

Proximity To Fast-Food Eateries Linked To Greater Risk Of Obesity

March 13, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A British study finds that people who live or work near fast-food restaurants tend to be more obese than those whose access is more limited. The study, based on data from 5,442 adults aged 29-62, showed that when the three exposure possibilities (work, home and commute) were combined, there was a significant relationship between take-out exposure and food consumption. Those who lived or worked close to fast-food take-out outlets had higher body mass indexes. The researchers said that replacing fast-food restaurants with more healthful outlets probably wouldn’t work. But the food offered could be changed for the better because "in the food environment, what matters is the menu … not the venue”.
T. Burgoine et al., "Associations between exposure to takeaway food outlets, takeaway food consumption, and body weight in Cambridgeshire, UK: population based, cross sectional study. BMJ", BMJ, March 13, 2014, © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Drinking Two Quarts Of Water A Day Does Not Contribute To Weight Loss

March 12, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Just about every diet plan recommends drinking a lot of water – usually eight 8-oz. glasses a day – to reduce appetite and help burn calories. But a nutrition professor at the University of Alabama could find no scientific evidence that drinking a lot of water leads to weight loss. She acknowledges that people need to drink plenty of fluids during the day, but they can come from many sources: diet soda, green tea, juice, powdered beverages mixed with water and, yes, plain water. Caffeinated beverages like coffee and tea also count, and they do hydrate. For weight loss, Beth Kitchin suggests long-term, science-based weight management programs like EatRight (by UA-Birmingham) or Volumetrics.
Beth Kitchin, "Debunking water myths: Weight loss, calorie burn and more", News release, University of Alabama, Birmingham, March 12, 2014, © University of Alabama, Birmingham
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Older Men Who Eat More Animal Protein Experience Less Mental, Physical Decline

March 11, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Life expectancy has increased steadily around the globe, but older people often lead lives plagued by mental and physical decline.  Researchers in Japan report that one way to combat  functional decline may be through  greater consumption of animal protein. With aging, the ability to absorb and process protein deteriorates. In their seven-year study, the researchers analyzed questionnaire data from 1,007 people whose average age was 67 years. Tests determined higher-level functional abilities  Men who consumed the most animal protein were 39 percent less likely to experience functional decline than those who ate the least animal protein. The association was not seen in women, nor were any benefits derived from eating plant protein in either sex.
Eri Imai et al., "Animal Protein Intake Is Associated with Higher-Level Functional Capacity in Elderly Adults: The Ohasama Study", Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, March 11, 2014, © Imai et al.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
Asia-Pacific
Japan

FDA May Drop Some Stick Margarine Products From GRAS List

March 11, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The FDA recently proposed removal of some processed food products – including stick margarines – containing partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs) from the list of foods generally recognized as safe (GRAS) because they contain high levels of trans fats, a significant contributor to heart disease and cardiac deaths. The industry association representing margarine manufacturers has advised against that move because most margarine products contain no partially hydrogenated oils and “margarine is not a significant contributor of trans fats to the American diet”. The National Association of Margarine Manufacturers said soft spread margarine is the “healthiest buttery spread option”, especially compared to real butter that is high in unhealthy saturated fat.
"National Association of Margarine Manufacturers Asks FDA to Report the Facts: Margarine Products are No Longer a Major Source of Trans Fat", News release, NAMM, March 11, 2014, © NAMM
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Bread, Cereals Contribute Heavily To Elevated Salt Consumption Among British Children

March 10, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A British study finds that children in London eat way too much salt, and they get it from some surprising sources. Researchers analyzed urine samples from 340 children aged five to 17. Five and six year olds ate 3.75 grams of salt a day, while teenagers between 13 and 17 ate 7.55 grams a day. Thirty-six percent of the sodium the children ate came from breads and cereals; meat products provided 19 percent and dairy products accounted for 11 percent. The American Heart Association recommends adults and children consume no more than 3.75 grams a day (about a teaspoon). Salt starts increasing the risk of high blood pressure in children starting at age one.
N. M. Marrero et al., "Salt Intake of Children and Adolescents in South London: Consumption Levels and Dietary Sources. ", Hypertension, March 10, 2014, © American Heart Association, Inc.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Unless You’re Over 65, Eating A Lot Of Protein Increases Risk Of Cancer, Mortality

March 10, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Two recent studies from the U.S. and Australia, one in mice and one in humans, found evidence that diets high in protein can actually be harmful over the long run. Protein-rich diets do have their benefits: they contribute to weight loss and to normalization of blood sugar levels. But the study in mice, which tested various ratios of protein to carbohydrates, found that animals that ate higher ratios of protein were leaner, but shorter-lived. The 18-year clinical study in 6,381 adults found that people aged 50 to 65 whose diet included high levels of animal protein were at much greater risk of cancer death and overall mortality. However, people over 65 who ate more animal protein survived longer. 
Kevin Helliker, "The Risk of High-Protein Diets", The Wall Street Journal, March 10, 2014, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Risk Of Cancer Death Among Older Adults Is About The Same For Protein-Eaters And Smokers

March 6, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study that tracked the dietary patterns of more than 6,000 Americans over 50 for 20 years found that eating an animal-protein-rich diet during middle age puts people at four times the risk of dying or cancer than eating a low-protein diet. That puts protein eating in the same risk category as smoking, the researchers said. Moreover, middle-aged people who eat a lot of animal protein – including meat, milk and cheese – are also more likely in general to die an early death.  Protein eaters were 74 percent more likely to die of any cause within the study period than their  low protein counterparts. They were also several times more likely to die of diabetes, the study found. The researchers concluded that what's good for a person earlier in life may be damaging at a later stage.
Morgan E. Levine et al., "Low Protein Intake Is Associated with a Major Reduction in IGF-1, Cancer, and Overall Mortality in the 65 and Younger but Not Older Population. ", Cell Metabolism, March 06, 2014, © Elsevier Inc.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Low Levels Of Omega-3 In Children May Result In Poor Sleep, Learning Problems

March 6, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
New U.K. research adds to the growing evidence of the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids. Scientists found that high levels of omega-3 DHA fatty acids in algae and seafood are also linked to improved sleep. The study involved 362 healthy seven- to nine-year olds who were all struggling readers. About 40 percent of the kids were reported – via parental questionnaires – to have regular sleep disturbances. For the study, these children were monitored nightly with wrist sensors. Those who received daily omega-3 supplements slept nearly an hour longer than those taking a placebo, and had seven fewer waking episodes per night. “Alarmingly low levels” of omega-3s in the blood of children could be related to poor sleep and, in turn, behavior and learning and learning problems, the researchers concluded.
Paul Montgomery et al. , "Fatty acids and sleep in UK children: Subjective and pilot objective sleep results from the DOLAB study – a randomized controlled trial. ", Journal of Sleep Research, March 06, 2014, © Montgomery et al.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Lab Studies Associating Cancer With Eating Red Meat May Be Flawed

March 6, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Recent studies associating the consumption of red and processed meat with a higher risk of colon cancer should be taken with a grain of salt, according to a paper published by 23 scientists. Much of the data were collected from studies in which animals ate large amounts of red meat without a balance of vegetables, fiber, milk or other sources of calcium. These other foods, cooperating with the bacteria that live in the gut, may actually protect the gut from cancer. Meat contains nutritionally beneficial compounds that are not carcinogenic, the researchers concluded, but when consumed in very high amounts may result in an imbalanced diet and thereby increase the risk of developing [colorectal cancer].”
Marije Oostindjer et al., "The role of red and processed meat in colorectal cancer development: A review, based on findings from a workshop.", Meat Science, March 06, 2014, © Oostindjer et al.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Norway

Refined Carbs – Not Saturated Fats – Are To Blame For Higher Obesity, Diabetes Rates

March 4, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
An American researcher who analyzed study data from the last 60 years says saturated fats are not to blame for the steady rise of obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Instead, he says, look to refined carbohydrates because diets low in saturated fats do not prevent heart disease, contrary to flawed research from the 1950s. Dr. James DiNicolantonio advises those who have experienced a heart attack to not replace saturated fats with refined carbs or omega 6 fatty acids like those found in processed corn or safflower oils. Instead, the best diet for heart health is one rich in omega-3 fatty acids, and low in refined carbohydrates, sugars and processed foods. He urges "a public health campaign”, like the anti-saturated fat campaign, that admits “we got it wrong," he says.
J. J. DiNicolantonio, "The cardiometabolic consequences of replacing saturated fats with carbohydrates or -6 polyunsaturated fats: Do the dietary guidelines have it wrong? ", Open Heart, March 04, 2014, © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & British Cardiovascular Society
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Global Diet May Be Diversifying, But It’s Based Increasingly On A Handful Of Super-Crops

March 4, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A scientist at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture says his analysis of 50 years of data shows that while diets around the world are diversifying, the foods eaten are increasingly Westernized and dependent on a small number of crops. The shift is due to increased international trade and urbanization – greater access to supermarkets and fast food, less time to cook, and no room for gardens. The upshot is that people are gradually eating fewer indigenous foods, like rice, sorghum and millet, and eating more of the “mega-foods”: corn, wheat, soybeans and palm oil. According to the study, people may be eating a greater variety of food products – the “standard global diet” – but it’s risky to base a global diet on just a handful of major crops.
Dan Charles, "In The New Globalized Diet, Wheat, Soy And Palm Oil Rule", NPR, March 04, 2014, © NPR
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide

Diet Rich In Omega-3s From Fish Linked To Lower Incidence Of Coronary Artery Disease

March 4, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Sticking to a Japanese-style diet that includes lots of fish would help American men reduce the risk of heart disease, according to a multinational study led by U.S. scientists. They followed 300 American and Japanese men for five years, noting their consumption of omega-3-rich oily fish and monitoring factors like cigarette smoking, cholesterol levels, alcohol consumption, diabetes rates and blood pressure. After adjusting for those factors,  the U.S. men had three times the incidence of coronary artery calcification as the Japanese men. Significantly, the levels of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids in the blood were more than 100 percent higher in the Japanese than in the white men.
A. Sekikawa et al., " Long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and incidence rate of coronary artery calcification in Japanese men in Japan and white men in the USA: population based prospective cohort study. ", Heart, March 04, 2014, © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & British Cardiovascular Society
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Asia-Pacific
United States of America
Japan

Healthy Diet During Pregnancy Reduces Risk Of Premature Birth

March 4, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Mothers-to-be can reduce the risk of a premature or preterm birth by making sure they eat a “prudent” diet of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and water, and even a “traditional” diet of boiled potatoes, fish and cooked vegetables, a British study finds. The researchers examined data from a Norwegian study of preterm births among 66,000 women between 2002 and 2008. They said their findings do not establish a causality between poor diet and premature births: the "Western" dietary pattern, for example, was not independently associated with preterm delivery. The data do show a link between maternal dietary habits and the health of the unborn child.
Linda Englund-Ögge et al., "Maternal dietary patterns and preterm delivery: results from large prospective cohort study", BMJ, March 04, 2014, © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Debate Rages In Diet Industry Over “Cleansing” Products And Regimens

March 3, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Physicians and nutritionists argue that the human body’s digestive system is already very efficient at removing harmful substances. But others – who are making millions of dollars selling detoxifying diets, diet books, supplements, juices, etc. – disagree, saying the liver, kidneys and colon are simply overwhelmed by the environmental toxins they have to deal with. And that’s the great debate in the $60 billion U.S. diet industry. Still, most gastroenterologists – acknowledging the confusion caused by the “jumble of science, pseudoscience and hype” of the cleansing industry – advise against the supplements, laxatives, enemas and irrigation devices sold to unclog the colon. For one thing, their use can lead ironically to constipation. Instead, eat more fruits and vegetables to keep the digestive system functioning normally.
Melinda Beck, "The Debate Over Juice Cleanses and Toxin Removal", The Wall Street Journal, March 03, 2014, © Dow Jones & Company, Inc.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Eating Fatty Fish Boosts The “Good" Cholesterol That Reduces Risk Of Cardiovascular Diseases

March 3, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Earlier studies have shown that high density lipoprotein (HDL or “good” cholesterol), especially large HDL particles, efficiently clean extra cholesterol off artery walls, reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study from Finland shows that diet can play a major role in the process. Participants who consumed at least three or four meals of salmon, rainbow trout or herring a week had more of these large HDL particles in their bloodstream than less frequent fish eaters. The researchers used advanced state-of-the-art metabolomics in the study that enabled a detailed analysis of lipoprotein particles.
Maria Lankinen et al., "Effects of Whole Grain, Fish and Bilberries on Serum Metabolic Profile and Lipid Transfer Protein Activities", PLoS ONE, March 03, 2014, © Lankinen et al.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Fructose Should Not Be Blamed For The Obesity Epidemic - Study

February 26, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Physicians, nutritionists and researchers continue to argue about whether consuming excess fructose plays a major role in the onset of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Now a meta-analysis by Canadian researchers of data from 13 clinical trials involving 260 healthy participants shows that fructose in and of itself is not to blame for the increase in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The researchers could find no evidence that there is something unique about the fructose molecule, or the way it is metabolized, that would cause the obesity epidemic. Overall intake of excess calories, not the source of the calories, is the real culprit.
S Chiu et al., "Effect of fructose on markers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled feeding trials", European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 26, 2014, © Chiu et al.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

Several Factors – Not Just Willpower – Account For Lapses When Dieting

February 24, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A small, week-long study among dieters has found that late night cravings, alcohol use and friends contribute significantly to a drop in willpower and self-control. For the study, 80 people who were dieting were given mobile phones to use as an electronic diary. Researchers found that participants gave in to food temptations just over 50 percent of the time, and were especially vulnerable at night. They were more likely to give in to alcoholic temptations than to eat a sugary snack or to overindulge. And they were often influenced by the presence of others, regardless of whether a dietary temptation was unexpected or whether the dieter went looking for something to eat.
Heather C. McKee et al., "An Ecological Momentary Assessment of Lapse Occurrences in Dieters. ", Annals of Behavioral Medicine, February 24, 2014, © Springer
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Multivitamin Supplements Reduce Risk Of Cataracts In Older Men

February 20, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Scientists have suspected for awhile that there’s a link between multivitamin supplements and healthy eyes, but there was no reliable scientific data to support the theory. Now researchers at Harvard report results from a randomized, double-blind study from 1997 to 2011 of 14,641 U.S. male doctors age 50 and older, half of whom took a common daily multivitamin, plus vitamin C, vitamin E and beta carotene supplements. Half took a placebo. In the placebo group there were 945 cases of cataract, but only 872 cases in the multivitamin group, a nine percent decrease in risk. The risk was 13 percent for nuclear cataract, the most common variety of cataract associated with the aging process.
William G. Christen et al., "Effects of Multivitamin Supplement on Cataract and Age-Related Macular Degeneration in a Randomized Trial of Male Physicians", Ophthalmology, February 20, 2014, © American Academy of Ophthalmology
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Teens Exchange Water For Sugary Sodas In Successful Test Project

February 20, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A 30-day test program that encouraged high schoolers in the Appalachian foothills of Ohio to drink fewer sugary drinks and more water has succeeded, according to the program’s developer.  Dubbed “Sodabriety”, the program was presented as a challenge to teens in the region, where the  average number of sugared drinks was 2.5 servings a day over an average of four days a week. The teens – who had no idea about the high calorie content of sugared beverages – were particularly fond of oversized drinks. But during the program, which was monitored by teens themselves, rather than teachers or other adults, the average daily number of sugary drinks dropped  to 1.3, and the number of days dropped to two a week. Water consumption increased nearly 30 percent.
Laureen H. Smith et al., "Piloting “Sodabriety”: A School-Based Intervention to Impact Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption in Rural Appalachian High Schools", Journal of School Health, February 20, 2014, © American School Health Association
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Obese Patients Who Feel Judged Negatively By Physicians Have A Harder Time Losing Weight

February 18, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The perception by obese patients that their primary care physician had passed judgment on their size led to less effective weight loss efforts, a Johns Hopkins University study has found. The study involved a national Internet-based survey of 600 obese adults who regularly saw their primary care doctors. Asked if their doctor ever judged them because of their weight, 21 percent believed they had. Ninety-six percent of those who felt judged said they tried to lose weight, compared to 84 percent who did not. Fourteen percent of those who felt judged lost 10 percent or more of their body weight, though 20 percent of those who did not feel judged lost a similar amount.
Kimberly A. Gudzune et al., "Perceived judgment about weight can negatively influence weight loss: A cross-sectional study of overweight and obese patients", Preventive Medicine, February 18, 2014, © Elsevier Inc.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Infants Who Don’t Respond To Body Signals Of “Fullness” May Be On Track For Adult Obesity

February 17, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A British study that compared same-age, same-sex babies in the same family revealed that a hearty appetite, and unresponsiveness to satiety signals, in infancy may be a portent of future obesity. The researchers analyzed data – measures of satiety responsiveness and food responsiveness – from non-identical, same-sex twins born in the U.K. in 2007. Infant twins who were more food responsive or less satiety responsive grew faster than their co-twins. The researchers advised parents to be alert for these tendencies because this behavior could put a growing child at risk of gaining weight too fast, putting on an unhealthy amount of weight, and being obese as an adult.
Clare H. Llewellyn et al., "Satiety Mechanisms in Genetic Risk of Obesity", JAMA Pediatrics, February 17, 2014, © American Medical Association
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Deadly Form Of Stroke Is Linked To Deficiency In Vitamin C

February 14, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A French study of 65 stroke victims found that, compared to healthy people, forty-one percent had normal levels of vitamin C in their blood and the rest –  59 percent – had either depleted or deficient levels. The researchers said vitamin C deficiency should be considered a risk factor for the severe, often deadly, type of stroke known as hemorrhagic, where a blood vessel in the brain ruptures. Other risk factors included overweight, high blood pressure and drinking alcohol. Vitamin C is found in many fruits and vegetables: oranges, papaya, peppers, broccoli, strawberries, etc.
Stéphane Vannier, "Can citrus ward off your risk of stroke?", Presentation, American Academy of Neurology's upcoming annual meeting, February 14, 2014, © American Academy of Neurology
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
France

Healthful Habits Acquired Early In Adulthood Pay Big Dividends Later In Life

February 12, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A study that followed 495 German men and women over 18 years concluded that acquiring healthful habits early in adulthood is a major determinant of how healthy one is later in life. The researchers randomly selected the group, average age of 45, beginning in 1992. They were then monitored every five years until 2002, then finally in 2010.  The analysis of the data collected over these intervals revealed that stress management strategies, as well as nutrition and physical exercise habits, influenced physical fitness and health in 1992. And those initial nutrition and physical exercise habits affected the fitness of participants over the following 18 years.
Lena Lämmle et al., "Does initial behavior predict our physical fitness and health 18 years later? ", Psychology of Sport and Exercise, February 12, 2014, © Elsevier Ltd.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Germany

Goodbye Quick Energy Boosts, Hello “Sustainable Food Energy”

February 10, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Because of increased stress and demands of work and family, Americans are apparently more tired than in the past. But – food companies are acutely aware of this – Americans are turning away from energy drinks that provide a quick “one and done” jump-start. Instead they want foods that provide “sustainable energy”, specifically from protein and fiber content. With that fact in mind food products from cereal to snacks – and yes, even dog food – are being marketed as energy sources that keep you “full and fueled” for longer periods of time. An example is Post Foods, whose new line of Honey Bunches of Oats breakfast cereals is branded as "Morning Energy" – loaded  with whole grain, protein and fiber.
E.J. Schultz, "Food Brands Try to Wake Up Sales With New 'Energy' Appeals", Advertising Age, February 10, 2014, © Crain Communications
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Monkeys Fed Omega-3-Rich Diet Have Highly Developed Neural Networks

February 6, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Oregon researchers who used functional brain imaging in live, older rhesus macaque monkeys show that animals whose diet was rich in omega-3 fatty acids had highly connected and well-organized neural networks compared to those whose diet lacked omega-3s. The imaging data show how similar the brain networks in monkeys and humans are, but “only in the context of a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids”. The next step is to see if monkeys with deficits in certain neural networks have behavioral patterns similar to those in humans with neurological conditions like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism.
D. S. Grayson et al., "Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Modulate Large-Scale Systems Organization in the Rhesus Macaque Brain", Journal of Neuroscience, February 06, 2014, © Grayson et al.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Novel Dietary Supplement Improves Brain Processing Speed In Older Adults

February 6, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Scientists in Florida have concocted a dietary supplement rich in antioxidants and other natural components that boosts the speed of information processing in the brains of older adults. The supplement (NT-020) contains extracts of blueberries and green tea combined, as well as vitamin D3 and amino acids like carnosine. The mixture was tested in a two-month clinical trial involving 105 healthy adults aged 65 to 85. Test results at the end of study show modest improvements in two measures of cognitive processing speed for those taking the supplement compared to those taking a placebo. Processing speed – in areas like memory and verbal ability – is most often affected early in cognitive aging.
Brent Small et al., "Nutraceutical Intervention Improves Older Adults’ Cognitive Functioning", Rejuvenation Research, February 06, 2014, © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Mediterranean Diet Reduces Heart Disease Risk Better Than Low-Fat Diet

February 6, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts and fish – basically the Mediterranean diet – is a better way to reduce cardiovascular risk than by lowering fat intake, according to a review of studies on the subject. Clinical trials conducted over the last fifty years usually compared low fat, low saturated fat, low dietary cholesterol and high polyunsaturated fat eating to conventional meals. Though those diets did reduce cholesterol levels, they did not reduce fatal heart attacks or other coronary heart disease deaths. In their survey of studies, the U.S. researchers found that Mediterranean-style diets prevent heart disease, even though they may not lower total serum or LDL cholesterol.
James E. Dalen et al., "Diets to Prevent Coronary Heart Disease 1957- 2013: What Have We Learned? ", The American Journal of Medicine, February 06, 2014, © Elsevier Inc.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Study Finds That Yogurt Consumption Significantly Cuts Risk Of Adult Diabetes

February 5, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
British researchers who analyzed dietary data collected from more than 25,000 men and women living in Norfolk, U.K., over 11 years, found that those who ate more low-fat fermented dairy products, including cottage cheese and yogurt, reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 24 percent. When the researchers focused on yogurt alone, which comprises 85 percent of fermented dairy products, they found a 28 percent reduced risk of diabetes.
Laura M. O’Connor et al., "Dietary dairy product intake and incident type 2 diabetes: a prospective study using dietary data from a 7-day food diary", Diabetologia, February 05, 2014, © O’Connor et al.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Mediterranean Diet Linked To Lower Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease

February 4, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
An analysis of dietary questionnaire data provided by 780 U.S. firefighters finds that those who stuck to a modified Mediterranean diet (MMD) were less likely to have metabolic syndrome: a large waistline, high triglyceride levels, low HDL ("good") cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, or high blood sugar – all risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The U.S. researchers said the MMD firefighters showed a 35 percent decreased risk for metabolic syndrome, and also had a 43 percent lower risk of weight gain, compared to others. Consistent with previous research, obese participants in the firefighter study reported eating more fast foods and sugary drinks.
Justin Yang et al., "Modified Mediterranean Diet Score and Cardiovascular Risk in a North American Working Population", PLoS ONE, February 04, 2014, © Yang et al.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Vitamin C And E Supplementation Hinders Endurance During Athletic Training

February 3, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Although it’s probably too late to help the Olympic athletes at Sochi, a finding by Norwegian researchers about the negative impact of vitamin E and C supplementation on endurance could help future competitors. An 11-week clinical study involved 54 young and healthy men and women randomly assigned to take vitamin C or vitamin E supplements, or a placebo. The participants were monitored closely as they took part in an endurance training program, mostly running. The study found that the vitamin C and E supplements seemed to blunt the improvement of muscle endurance by disrupting cellular adaptations in exercised muscles.
Paulsen G et al., "Vitamin C and E supplementation hampers cellular adaptation to endurance training in humans: a double-blind randomized control trial", Journal of Physiology, February 03, 2014, © The Physiological Society
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Norway

American Teens Consume Way Too Much Salt, Study Finds

February 3, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Almost all adolescents in a cross-sectional U.S. study reported consuming double the amount of salt recommended daily, pretty much the same amount as adults, putting them in danger of obesity and damaging inflammation. Researchers gathered self-reported data from 766 healthy teenagers, finding that 97 percent exceeded the American Heart Association’s recommended daily intake of 1,500 mg of sodium. The study adjusted for what the teens ate and drank, and still found a correlation between salt intake and obesity. The high-sodium consumers also had high levels of a compound secreted by immune cells that contributes to chronic inflammation and to autoimmune diseases like lupus and arthritis.
H. Zhu et al., "Dietary Sodium, Adiposity, and Inflammation in Healthy Adolescents", Pediatrics, February 03, 2014, © American Academy of Pediatrics
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Glucose And Fructose Have Same Metabolic Impact, So Substitution Would Be Pointless

January 31, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Canadian researchers report in a review of earlier studies that there’s really no difference between fructose and glucose on human metabolism. Fructose, often in the form of high fructose corn syrup, is used extensively in processed foods, and has been blamed for contributing to the obesity epidemic. But when the researchers analyzed the scientific literature, they found that consuming fructose does increase total cholesterol and triglyceride fats found in blood after eating a meal. But it does not appear to affect insulin production, other fat levels in the blood, or markers of fatty liver disease any more than glucose does. So there’s no point in substituting glucose for fructose in foods.
John L. Sievenpiper et al., "Fructose vs. glucose and metabolism", Current Opinion in Lipidology, January 31, 2014, © Wolters Kluwer Health
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

High-Protein Diet Is Risky Without Fruits And Vegetables

January 29, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A Spanish study in rats shows that high-protein diets, like Dukan and Atkins, boost the risk of developing kidney problems, unless supplemented with fruits and vegetables. Animals on a high-protein diet lost as much as 10 percent of their body weight over the 12-week study, but the protein had a negative effect on kidney structure, a signal of an increased risk of kidney disease and serious pathologies like calcium kidney stones. High protein foods drastically reduce urinary citrate, an inhibitor of calcium salt crystallization and urinary pH. The researchers noted, however, that fruits and vegetables added to the diet reduce the risk of kidney stones forming. Why? Potassium and magnesium compensate for the acidity of the high-protein diet.
Aparicio VA et al., "High-protein diets and renal status in rats", Nutricion Hospitalaria, January 29, 2014, © Nutricion Hospitalaria
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Weight Loss Programs
Atkins
Other Diets
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Spain

Probiotics Supplements Help Women – But Not Men – Lose Weight

January 28, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Canadian researchers have found in a clinical study that women who took probiotics supplements in pill form lost twice as much weight as women in a non-probiotic control group. Probiotics supplements had no impact on the weight of men in the study, however, a finding that baffled the researchers. The study was conducted among 125 overweight men and women over 24 weeks. The average weight loss was 5.6 kg in women in the probiotic group and 2.6 kg in the placebo group. According to the lead researcher, probiotics may act by altering the permeability of the intestinal wall, keeping certain pro-inflammatory molecules from entering the bloodstream and causing a chain reaction that leads to glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes, and obesity.
Marina Sanchez et al., "Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CGMCC1.3724 supplementation on weight loss and maintenance in obese men and women", British Journal of Nutrition, January 28, 2014, © Cambridge University Press
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
Canada

Vitamin D2 Supplementation Worsens Muscle Damage From Heavy Lifting

January 27, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Research conducted at a North Carolina university found that “power athletes” – intense weight lifters and auto racing pit crews, for example –  would be better off staying away from vitamin D2 supplements. The study was conducted among NASCAR pit crew athletes, half of whom consumed 3,800 international units (IU) a day of a plant-based vitamin D2, the other half a placebo. The researchers thought taking vitamin D2 would reduce inflammation and speed recovery of muscle damage from heavy lifting. Instead, the supplement increased exercise-induced muscle damage in the pit crew athletes.
David Nieman et al., "Vitamin D2 Supplementation Amplifies Eccentric Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage in NASCAR Pit Crew Athletes", Nutrients, January 27, 2014, © MDPI AG
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Animal Study Finds Hope For Dietary Treatment For Alzheimer’s

January 24, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A study in mice finds that even slight changes in the diet of Alzheimer’s patients may, if adopted early and for a long period of time, lead to significant changes in brain metabolism and improved memory. The researchers tested the effects of a fish oil-enriched diet, a plant sterol diet, and a commercially available supplement known as Fortasyn. The diets led to improvements in different ways, including memory and plaque formation, The Finnish researchers concluded that a single cocktail of nutrients would probably not provide the best outcome at this time. But further research, especially in humans, may lead to development of a diet-based treatment for Alzheimer's disease.
Hennariikka Koivisto et al., "Special lipid-based diets alleviate cognitive deficits in the APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease independent of brain amyloid deposition", Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, January 24, 2014, © Elsevier Inc.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Finland

Impulsive Behavior Linked To Food Addiction, And To Obesity

January 24, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
People with impulsive personalities are more likely to report higher levels of food addiction and obesity, a U.S. study has found. Food addiction, a relatively new disorder, is a compulsive pattern of eating similar to drug addiction. The study used two different scales to determine levels of food addiction and impulsivity among the 233 participants, then compared these results with body mass index, a measure of obesity. Researchers said impulsive behavior was not necessarily associated with obesity, but impulsive behaviors can lead to food addiction, which is an indicator of obesity.
Cara M. Murphy et al., "Interrelationships among impulsive personality traits, food addiction, and Body Mass Index", Appetite, January 24, 2014, © Elsevier B.V.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Benefit Liver Metabolism In Many Unforeseen Ways, Study Finds

January 23, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Omega-3 fatty acids – especially DHA – could be significantly effective in preventing fatty liver disease and other metabolic problems caused by the Western diet, according to scientists at Oregon State University. In a study in mice that used a technology known as “metabolomics”, DHA supplements produced many unanticipated benefits, including changes in vitamin and carbohydrate metabolism, protein and amino acid function and lipid metabolism. DHA supplementation prevented metabolic damage caused by the Western diet: excessive consumption of red meat, sugar, saturated fat and processed grain.
Christopher M. Depner et al., "A Metabolomic Analysis of Omega-3 Fatty Acid-Mediated Attenuation of Western Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in LDLR-/- Mice", PLoS ONE, January 23, 2014, © Depner et al.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Lingonberries Prevent Weight Gain, Lower Blood Sugar And Insulin, In Animal Study

January 23, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
The Scandinavian fruit lingonberries prevented weight gain in mice that ate a high-fat diet, a Swedish study reports. The berries also reduced blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Lingonberries were tested against other berries: bilberry, raspberry, crowberry, blackberry, prune, blackcurrant or açai berry in mice fed high-fat and low-fat diets. After three months, the lingonberry group had not put on more weight than the low-fat mice, their blood sugar and insulin readings were similar, and cholesterol levels and levels of fat in the liver were lower. Blackcurrants and bilberries also produced good effects, though not as pronounced as the lingonberries, researchers said.
Lovisa Heyman et al., "Evaluation of Beneficial Metabolic Effects of Berries in High-Fat Fed C57BL/6J Mice", Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, January 23, 2014, © Heyman et al.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Sweden

Tests Show Some Popular Fish Oil Supplements Do Not Contain Promised Levels Of Omega-3s

January 22, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A chemical testing company that analyzed 30 top-selling brands of fish oil supplements found six whose levels of omega-3 fatty acids were 30 percent lower than stated on the labels. The tests also showed that at least 12 products contained levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) – promoted as beneficial for brain and heart health – that were 14 percent lower than stated. Fish oil products – a largely unregulated market that – generated about $1.2 billion in sales among millions of consumers in the United States in 2013, “making them among the most popular dietary supplements on the market”.
Anahad O'Connor, "What’s in Your Fish Oil Supplements?", The New York Times, January 22, 2014, © The New York Times Company
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Consumers Eating Less Red Meat For Health Reasons, Or They’re Buying Better Quality Cuts

January 22, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A lot of consumers surveyed by Mintel say they ate less red meat -- or better quality meat -- in 2013. Thirty-nine percent say they ate less beef or other red meat, and 25 percent ate less pork. Despite the trend, some 10 percent ate more red meat, and 13 percent ate more pork. According to the market researcher, the drop in red meat consumption is due almost totally to concerns about eating too much fat and cholesterol. Of those who continue to eat red meat regularly, about 16 percent admit to trading up to higher quality cuts of meat, an “opportunity” for marketers.
"More than one-third of Americans cut back on red meat for health reasons", Report, Mintel, January 22, 2014, © Mintel Group Ltd.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Higher Levels Of Omega-3s In Blood Prevents Brain Shrinkage From Aging, Disease

January 22, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A long-term clinical study of 1,111 women by U.S. researchers shows that people with higher levels of the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil may tend to have larger brain volumes as they age, preserving one to two years of brain health. One of the signs of Alzheimer’s disease – and normal aging – is a decrease in brain volume. Researchers measured levels of omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA in red blood cells in the women, following up eight years later with an MRI to measure brain volume. By that time, the women – average age of 78 – with levels of fatty acids twice that of other women had a 0.7 percent larger brain volume.
J. V. Pottala et al., "Higher RBC EPA DHA corresponds with larger total brain and hippocampal volumes", Neurology, January 22, 2014, © American Academy of Neurology
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Celiac Patients Tolerate Quinoa Added To Gluten-Free Diet

January 21, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Despite evidence from lab experiments that the nutritious grain quinoa can cause some digestive problems for celiac disease patients, a new British study in patients themselves shows that the grain, when added to a gluten-free diet, is actually well-tolerated and does not worsen the condition. Celiac is an immune-based reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. The new study, which tracked 19 celiac patients over six weeks, shows that eating about 50 grams of quinoa every day led to normal blood test ranges, and even improved the structure of the small intestine. Patients were allowed to cook the grain any way they wished.
Victor F Zevallos et al., "Gastrointestinal Effects of Eating Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) in Celiac Patients", The American Journal of Gastroenterology, January 21, 2014, © The American College of Gastroenterology
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
United Kingdom

Fortified Mediterranean Diet Cuts Risk Of Artery-Blocking Disease

January 21, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A seven-year clinical trial conducted in Spain among more than 7,000 men and women over age 55 has found a significant association between a fortified Mediterranean diet and a lower risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD). In peripheral arterial disease plaque – fat, cholesterol, calcium, etc. – builds up in the arteries that carry blood to the head, organs, and limbs, leading to atherosclerosis (hardening). The study confirmed that a Mediterranean diet fortified either with extra virgin olive oil or nuts reduced the risk of PAD in participants.
Miguel Ruiz-Canela et al., "Association of Mediterranean Diet With Peripheral Artery Disease", JAMA, January 21, 2014, © American Medical Association
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Weight Loss Programs
Other Diets
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Spain

Researchers Determine Why A Fiber-Rich Diet Reduces Risk Of Colon Inflammation, Cancer

January 16, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers have determined that a high-fiber diet cuts the risk of colon problems because fiber – which supports good bacteria in the gut – activates a receptor that helps prevent colon inflammation and cancer (while protecting the cardiovascular system).  The same receptor is activated by high levels of niacin, administered by doctors when a patient has abused antibiotics, destroying beneficial bacteria. Good bacteria in the colon thrive on fiber and its digestion produces butyrate, a fatty acid that naturally activates the receptor, Gpr109a. The relationship is limited to the colon, where butyrate levels can soar with a high-fiber diet.
Nagendra Singh et al., "Activation of Gpr109a, Receptor for Niacin and the Commensal Metabolite Butyrate, Suppresses Colonic Inflammation and Carcinogenesis", Immunity, January 16, 2014, © Elsevier Inc.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

“Diet” Sodas Actually Work Against A Dieter’s Weight Loss Plan

January 16, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Drinking diet soda is not the answer to losing weight, according to U.S. scientists who analyzed national data and determined that artificial sweeteners activate reward centers in the brain in a way that causes the sweet sensors to malfunction. The brain's sweet sensors can’t gauge energy consumption accurately because the artificial sweeteners disrupt appetite control, resulting in increased food intake overall. Bottom line: overweight and obese adults who drink diet beverages consume more calories from food than obese or overweight adults who drink regular soda or other sugary beverages.
Sara N. Bleich et al., "Diet Beverage Consumption and Caloric Intake Among US Adults Overall and by Body Weight", American Journal of Public Health, January 16, 2014, © American Public Health Association
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Vitamin D Associated With Milder Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms

January 16, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Higher levels of vitamin D in the blood of Parkinson’s disease patients are associated with less severe symptoms, especially among patients who are not suffering from dementia, a U.S. study finds. Investigators tested  286 patients with Parkinson’s, finding that all patients with higher plasma vitamin D levels had lower symptom severity, better cognition, and less depression, but the relationships were even stronger in those who were not demented. Of the 286 subjects, 61 were considered to be demented. The researchers found that higher levels of serum vitamin D3 in the non-demented patients were associated with greater fluency for naming vegetables and animals, and immediate and delayed recall on a verbal learning test.
Amie L. Peterson et al., "Memory, Mood, and Vitamin D in Persons with Parkinson’s Disease", Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, January 16, 2014, © IOS Press
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

More Good News About Omega-3s: Reduced Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

January 15, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A Finnish university study finds that high blood levels of long chain omega-3  fatty acids – found in fish and fish oils – are associated with a significantly reduced risk of type 2 diabetes in men. The study collected dietary data on 2,212 men between 42 and 60 years of age, beginning in 1984. Thhose with the highest concentrations of omega-3s in their blood were 33 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Along with weight management, exercise, and a well-rounded diet, the researchers recommended at least two fish meals a week, preferably fatty fish like salmon, rainbow trout, herring, anchovy, sardine or mackerel.
Jyrki K. Virtanen et al., "Serum Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Risk of Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Men", Diabetes Care, January 15, 2014, © American Diabetes Association
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
EMEA
Europe
Finland

Fast Food Diet Is A Symptom Of The Childhood Obesity Problem, Not The Cause

January 15, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
Eating fast food is not the root cause of the childhood obesity problem, as some have suggested, but only a symptom of a deeper problem that begins at home, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina who examined data collected on 4,466 children who two years to 18 years of age. In other words, it’s basically the parents’ fault. Kids do not eat adequate amounts of fruits and vegetables as they’re growing up, chowing down instead on large amounts of processed food and sugar-sweetened beverages. These meal patterns are in turn enforced at school. “This is what is really driving children’s obesity,” concluded one researcher.
J. M. Poti et al., "The association of fast food consumption with poor dietary outcomes and obesity among children: is it the fast food or the remainder of the diet?", American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, January 15, 2014, © American Society for Nutrition
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America

Algal Culture Extract Shown To Increase Good Cholesterol, Even In High-Fat Diet

January 9, 2014: 12:00 AM EST
A proprietary algal culture – known as “PAZ” or “ProAlgaZyme” – was found to support healthy cholesterol balance by increasing “good” cholesterol (HDL) and reducing non-HDL cholesterol while consuming a high-fat diet. The testing in lab animals showed that PAZ helped remove excess cholesterol from cell storage and transported it to the liver for excretion from the body. Health Enhancement Products, Inc., maker of the algal culture extracts, says  the effects of its product in improving "good" cholesterol, and therefore cardiovascular health, “are significant and potentially wide-reaching”.
Smiti Gupta et al., "ProAlgaZyme sub-fraction improves the lipoprotein profile of hypercholesterolemic hamsters, while inhibiting production of betaine, carnitine, and choline metabolites", Journal of Nutrition & Metabolism, January 09, 2014, © Geamanu et al.
Domains
DIET NEWS
Diet Insights
Diet Research & Advice
Geographies
Worldwide
North America
United States of America
<<78910111213141516>> Total results:1874 References Per Page:
>> <<
Developed by Yuri Ingultsov Software Lab.