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Dietitian Warns Of Dangers Of Feeding Tube Diet Fad

April 16, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A Baylor University dietitian warns that the crash weight-loss fad known as the feeding tube diet is more harmful than liquid “starvation diets”. The diet, which has been promoted by some doctors as a quick way for women to shed pounds before their wedding day, involves the feeding of protein, fat and water through a nasal feeding tube. According to Suzy Weems, Ph.D., the technique can cause infections and irritation and should not be used as a substitute for healthy exercise and calorie control.
Suzy Weems, Ph.D., "Diet Fad of Eating Through the Nose Could Be a Nightmare, Nutrition Expert Says", News release, Baylor University, April 16, 2012, © Baylor University
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People Who Eat High-Fiber Foods Have Lower Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease

April 16, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A Swedish study of the eating habits and health status of 20,000 people has found that high-fiber foods provide protection against cardiovascular disease, especially in women. The researchers could not determine why a high-fiber diet was more beneficial for women than men, though they did note that women tended to get their fiber from fruits and vegetables, while men got their fiber from bread. No correlation was  found between other dietary nutrients – e.g., saturated fat or sugar – and cardiovascular disease.
Peter Wallström et al., "Dietary Fiber and Saturated Fat Intake Associations with Cardiovascular Disease Differ by Sex in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort", PLoS ONE, April 16, 2012, © Wallström et al.
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Dietary Supplement Trade Group Disputes Study On Heart Benefits Of Omega-3s

April 9, 2012: 10:52 PM EST
A dietary supplement industry trade group has issued a statement disputing the findings of a recent study that said there wasn’t enough evidence that omega-3 fatty acid supplements improve cardiovascular health in heart patients. The Natural Products Association (NPA) pointed to a “wealth of evidence” from epidemiological and observational studies showing that omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial for heart disease. According to the NPA, two studies in particular – the GISSI-Prevenzione trial and the Japan EPA Lipid Intervention study – showed that omega-3 supplements reduced the risk of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction and nonfatal stroke.
Mike Keaton, "NPA Expert Says Study on Omega-3 Supplements and Cardiovascular Disease “Limited” and “Inaccurate”", Press release, Natural Products Association (NPA), April 09, 2012, © Natural Products Association (NPA)
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Junk Food Consumption Linked To Depression – Study

April 6, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
New Spanish research finds that people whose diet includes a lot of diet-busting fast food are more likely to be clinically depressed. The population study involved 9,000 adults. People who ate the most fast foods – burgers, hot dogs, pizza, etc. – were 36 percent more likely to develop clinical depression compared to those who ate the least amount. Likewise, those who ate the most commercial baked goods – cookies, cakes and desserts – were 38 percent more likely to develop depression. According to the researchers, no studies prove eating specific foods, like doughnuts or Little Debbie's, causes depression. It’s possible, they suggested, that people prone to becoming depressed are more likely to seek comfort through unhealthy foods.
"Fast Food is Linked to Depression", Diet Nutrition Advisor, April 06, 2012, © Diet & Nutrition
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Exercise Plus Caffeine Wards Off Skin Cancer, Prevents Inflammation Linked To Cancer

April 3, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers who evaluated the effects of caffeine and exercise on lab animals bred to be at high risk of skin cancer found that the combination cut the number of skin tumors by 62 percent, and the size by 85 percent. Similar, but smaller, results were found with caffeine or exercise by themselves. There was a 27 percent reduction in tumors in caffeine-only mice, and a 61 percent reduction in tumor size. Tumor activity decreased by 35 percent in exercise-only mice, while tumor volume decreased by 70 percent. The connection between the impact of caffeine and exercise is inflammation, which declined as much as 92 percent in mice that exercised and consumed caffeine, researchers said.
Yao-Ping Lu, Ph.D. et al., "Caffeine and Exercise May Be Protective Against Skin Cancer Caused by Sun Exposure, Study Suggests", News release, presentation at the AACR annual meeting, April 03, 2012, © American Association for Cancer Research
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New Study Confirms Correlation Between Fast Food And Risk Of Depression

March 30, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A study by scientists in Spain finds that consumers of fast food are 51 percent more likely to develop depression than those who eat little or none. This data support earlier research, recording 657 new cases of depression out of 12,059 people analyzed over more than six months. The researchers also note that the link between fast food and depression is “dose-responsive”: the more you eat, the greater the likelihood of depression. Participants who ate the most fast food and commercial baked goods were more likely to be single, less active and have poor dietary habits, which include eating less fruit, nuts, fish, vegetables and olive oil. The group was also more likely to smoke and work more than 45 hours a week.
Almudena Sánchez-Villegas et al., "Fast-food and commercial baked goods consumption and the risk of depression", Public Health Nutrition, March 30, 2012, © Cambridge University Press
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Low Glycemic Index Foods At Breakfast Reduce Hunger Pangs And Blood Sugar Spikes

March 30, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A study by Purdue University researchers reports that eating low glycemic index foods –particularly almonds – at breakfast increases feelings of satiety and fullness and helps prevent spikes in blood sugar all morning and after lunch. Foods with a high glycemic index, including many highly processed foods containing carbohydrates, are digested rapidly, resulting in high fluctuations in blood sugar levels and increased hunger pangs later in the day. Low glycemic index foods produce gradual rises in blood sugar and insulin levels, and are considered healthier. The study focused on the impact of eating almonds at breakfast, finding that the nuts make people feel fuller while lowering blood sugar concentrations.
Kantha Shelke and Richard Mattes, "Glycemic Index Foods at Breakfast Can Control Blood Sugar Throughout the Day", News release, presentation at the Institute of Food Technologists' Wellness 12 meeting, March 30, 2012, © Institute of Food Technologists
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Researchers Determine Optimum Level Of Fish Oil To Add To Yogurt For Heart Health

March 28, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Consumers who want to increase their daily intake of heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids might someday be able to eat fish oil-supplemented yogurt, according to a U.S. study. Scientists tested different levels of fish oil in a savory chili and lime flavored yogurt. A one percent concentration of fish oil – which provides more than the daily amount suggested by the American Heart Association – would probably be acceptable to a majority of Americans, the researchers found in their testing. A higher concentration was found to be too fishy flavored to be acceptable. “A potential market exists for this population," the researchers concluded.
M. Rognlien et al., "Consumer perception and sensory effect of oxidation in savory-flavored yogurt enriched with n-3 lipids", Journal of Dairy Science, March 28, 2012, © Elsevier B.V.
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Drink Sugary Or Sugar-Free Drinks? Overall Diet Is Much More Important

March 28, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study that examined the interplay of beverage consumption and overall diet patterns has found that diet is the key factor, regardless of whether sugary or sugar-free beverages are consumed. The healthiest of the 4,000 people studied were those who ate a “prudent” diet (i.e., fruits, vegetables, fish, whole grains, nuts and milk) and did not consume diet beverages. They had a lower risk of high waist circumference, high triglyceride levels and metabolic syndrome than those who ate a Western diet (i.e., fast foods, pizza, snacks, meats, etc.) and did not drink diet beverages. The second healthiest group was individuals with a prudent diet who also consumed diet beverages. Lastly, individuals who ate the Western diet had increased risk of heart disease, regardless of the kind of beverage they drank.
Kiyah J Duffey et al., "Dietary patterns matter: diet beverages and cardiometabolic risks in the longitudinal Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study", American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, March 28, 2012, © American Society for Nutrition
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Popcorn Touted As Nutrient-Rich Whole Grain Snack

March 27, 2012: 01:20 PM EST
People normally think of fruits and vegetables as the richest sources of the antioxidants known as polyphenols, but a recent study reports that whole-grain popcorn is an even richer source. A serving of popcorn – the only snack that is 100 percent unprocessed whole grain – packs 300 mg of polyphenols, compared to 114 mg per serving of sweet corn and 160 mg per serving of all fruits. The hulls of popcorn have the highest concentrations of polyphenols and fiber. But the researchers cautioned that though popcorn is nutritious, adding butter, salt and other high-calorie flavorings can turn the snack into a nutritional nightmare. They recommended eating air-popped popcorn for the lowest calorie count. Microwave popcorn and popcorn popped in oil both have twice as many calories as air-popped.
"Don't Forget to Eat Your Fruits, Veggies ... and Popcorn?", News report, HealthDay, March 27, 2012, via Yahoo! News, © HealthDay
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Study Finds That Regular Chocolate Eaters Are Actually Thinner

March 27, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study shows that adults who eat chocolate regularly tend to be thinner than those who don’t. For the study, researchers analyzed dietary and other information provided by 1,000 adults. They found that adults who ate chocolate on more days a week had a lower body mass index than those who ate chocolate less often. The researchers acknowledged that the size of the effect was modest, but nevertheless significant. The chocolate eaters consumed more calories and did not behave differently – for example, exercising more often – than the non-chocolate eaters. The data, researchers concluded, suggest that the composition of calories, not just the number, is important to the ultimate impact on weight.
B. A. Golomb et al., "Association Between More Frequent Chocolate Consumption and Lower Body Mass Index", Archives of Internal Medicine, March 27, 2012, © American Medical Association
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The Right Snacks Can Help Dieters Lose Weight

March 26, 2012: 12:40 PM EST
Americans are getting more of their daily calories today from snacks than they did three decades ago, dietitian Megan Murphy writes. And they eat many more salty snacks (low- and high-fat), candy, nuts, seeds and cereals. Snacking on high-fat desserts like cake has decreased, but snacking on low-fat desserts has increased. However, she notes, snacking doesn’t necessarily have to contribute to the obesity epidemic and can be a healthy part of a weight-loss diet, if certain guidelines are followed: eat low-calorie snacks – 100 to 200 calories – to stave off hunger;  avoid sugary or fatty snacks; choose snacks rich in protein and fiber; carry healthy snacks with you rather than buying junk snacks; and eat smaller meals after snacking during the day. 
Megan Murphy, "Snack time: Eating between meals may help dieters lose weight, but keep it reasonable", Commercial Appeal, March 26, 2012, © Memphis Commercial Appeal
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Green Coffee Beans Show Potential As Fast Weight Loss Method

March 27, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. scientists report that supplementing a low-fat diet and regular exercise with multiple capsules of green (unroasted) coffee extract every day seems to be a safe, effective, inexpensive and quick way to lose weight. For the cross-over study, 16 obese or overweight young adults took green coffee bean capsules, alternating between 700 mg and 1,050 mg capsules daily, for 22 weeks. People cycled through the two doses as well as a placebo capsule, each for six-week periods. Average weight loss was  17 pounds, and included an average 10.5 percent decrease in overall body weight and 16 percent decrease in body fat. Weight loss might have been faster, except that each participant received the placebo and the lower dose of  extract during the study.
Joe Vinson, Ph.D., "New Evidence On Effects of Green Coffee Beans in Weight Loss", News release, presentation at a meeting of the American Chemical Society, March 27, 2012, © American Chemical Society
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Soy-Derived Isoflavones Lower Blood Pressure, Study Finds

March 25, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers who analyzed data from 5,115 black and white Americans over 20 years have found that moderate amounts of dietary isoflavone intake significantly lower blood pressure, especially among African Americans. Isoflavones are a nutrient found in soy products, as well as in green tea and peanuts. People who consumed more than 2.5 mg of isoflavones a day – 8 oz. of soymilk contains 22 mg – had significantly lower blood pressure than those who consumed less than 0.33 mg a day. The researchers said that eating soy protein, for example, with a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, low-fat dairy and whole grains could lower blood pressure by 10 mmHg for pre-hypertensives, and significantly reduce the chance of progressing to hypertension.
Safiya Richardson, "Dietary Isoflavone Intake is Associated with Lower Systolic Blood Pressure: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study", News release, presentation, American College of Cardiology's Scientific Session, March 25, 2012, © American College of Cardiology
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New Breakfast Patterns Present Sales Opportunities For Restaurants

March 23, 2012: 12:02 PM EST
Restaurants could reap some major benefits from recently-reported trends in breakfast eating patterns, food writer Sasha Orman reports. A major finding of the NPD Group is that breakfast is no longer a single big-meal occasion, but tends to be spread across two or even three occasions: coffee early, a small meal or snack later, etc. NPD says this new pattern presents new opportunities to entice customers. But to get the most out of the trend, restaurants “have to know what items are selling.” With the trend toward a series of small meals, “lumberjack-sized plates” won’t bolster sales. Restaurants need to think small, versatile, flexible to maximize income.
Sasha Orman , "Restaurants Cashing In on Second Breakfast", Food and Drink Digital, March 23, 2012, © WDM Group
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Foods Consumed During Breakfast “Eating Occasions” Vary Widely Among Americans

March 21, 2012: 11:01 AM EST
Market researcher NPD Group reports that only one in five “eating occasions” experienced by Americans before 11:00 a.m. consist of a complete or full breakfast meal. Forty-three percent of breakfast-time occasions consist only of a beverage, such as coffee, but no food. Other such occasions include a small or mini meal (24 percent) or a snack (11 percent). About 38 percent of Americans limit themselves to one morning eating or drinking occasion, but 41 percent consume a small early morning meal and then a late morning beverage. NPD says knowing about morning eating occasions “helps food manufacturers size the morning opportunity …”
"U.S. Consumers Fuel Their Morning with A Mix of Eating and Drinking Behaviors, Reports NPD", Press release, NPD, March 21, 2012, © NPD
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The Stronger the Smell Of Food, The Smaller The Bite Size, Research Finds

March 21, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Dutch research finds a correlation between the size of a bite of food and the strength of the aroma of that food, suggesting that aroma could provide a way to control portion size. Manipulating the odor of food could lead to a five to 10 percent decrease in the size of a bite consumed. For the study, participants were able to control portions of a custard-like dessert by pushing a button. Bite size was linked to aroma for the first and subsequent bites: the stronger the smell, the smaller the bite.
Rene A de Wijk et al., "Food aroma affects bite size", Flavour, March 21, 2012, © BioMed Central Ltd
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Mixed News About Antioxidants: Some Damage DNA, Others Kill Cancer Cells

March 19, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Using high-throughput chemical screening systems and robotics, U.S. researchers tested 4,000 chemicals for their impact on DNA, finding that 22 antioxidants actually damaged DNA. Three of the antioxidants – resveratrol, genistein and baicalein – are marketed or being studied as treatments for a variety of disorders, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes, osteopenia and osteoporosis and chronic hepatitis, as well as serving as an anti-aging treatment. However, in addition to damaging DNA, some antioxidants actually destroyed dividing cells, including tumor cells. The researchers warned that this surprising ability may be good for treating cancer, but not so good for treating other disorders, including diabetes.
J. T. Fox et al., "High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death", Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, March 19, 2012, © National Academy of Sciences
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Dietary Patterns In The U.S. Are Linked To Demographic Factors

March 14, 2012: 11:54 AM EST
Researchers have determined that there are five basic dietary patterns in the U.S., each of which is linked to demographic factors, including age, race, region, gender, income and education. The patterns were discovered through analysis of 21,636 questionnaires completed by black and white adults aged 45 and older. The five patterns are: southern (fried, processed meats, sugary drinks); traditional (Chinese and Mexican food, pasta, pizza, soup); healthy (fruits, vegetables, grains); sweets (snacks and desserts); and alcohol (proteins, alcohol, salads). The researchers found that blacks were more likely than whites to eat a southern dietary pattern and did not eat the alcohol pattern. And men, lower-income people and non-college graduates were more likely to follow the southern pattern.
"Researchers ID 'real' five food groups in the US based on eating patterns", Yahoo! News, March 14, 2012, via AFP Relax News , © AFP Relax News
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Demographic Factors Linked To Dietary Patterns In The U.S.

March 13, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers have determined that there are five basic dietary patterns in the U.S., each of which is linked to demographic factors, including age, race, region, gender, income and education. The patterns were discovered through analysis of 21,636 questionnaires completed by black and white adults aged 45 and older. The five patterns are: southern (fried, processed meats, sugary drinks); traditional (Chinese and Mexican food, pasta, pizza, soup); healthy (fruits, vegetables, grains); sweets (snacks and desserts); and alcohol (proteins, alcohol, salads). The researchers found that blacks were more likely than whites to eat a southern dietary pattern and did not eat the alcohol pattern. And men, lower-income people and non-college graduates were more likely to follow the southern pattern.
Suzanne Judd, Ph.D., "Dietary Patterns Exist Among US Adults Based On Demographics", News release, presentation at the American Heart Association scientific sessions, March 13, 2012, © American Heart Association
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Reducing Abdominal Fat Boosts Cardiovascular Performance

March 13, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
People who are overweight can improve the expansion capability of their arteries and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease by losing weight, especially in the belly area, on either a low-fat or low-carb diet, a U.S. study has found. For the study, 60 men and women who weighed an average of 215 pounds went on either a low-fat or low-carb diet for six months. Those on the low-carb diet lost an average of 28.9 pounds; those on the low-fat diet lost an average of 18.9 pounds. The researchers then measured arterial constriction after weight loss, finding that the amount of improvement in blood vessels was directly linked to how much belly fat was lost, regardless of the diet they were on.
Kerry J. Stewart, Ed.D., "Losing Belly Fat Whether from a Low-Carb or a Low-Fat Diet, Helps Improve Blood Vessel Function", News release, presentation at the American Heart Association scientific meeting, March 13, 2012, © Johns Hopkins Medicine
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Study Finds That Sugary Drinks Increase Risk Of Heart Disease In Men

March 12, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers who analyzed health data from nearly 43,000 men found that those who drank a 12-ounce sugary beverage every day were 20 percent more likely to experience heart disease than those who didn’t drink sugary beverages. Participants were mainly white males, aged 40-75 years, employed in a health-related profession. The researchers said the study’s findings add to the growing evidence that sugar-sweetened beverages “are detrimental to cardiovascular health.” The study found no correlation between consumption of artificially sweetened beverages and an increase risk of biomarkers for heart disease.
Lawrence de Koning et al., "Sweetened Beverage Consumption, Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Biomarkers of Risk in Men", Circulation, March 12, 2012, © American Heart Association, Inc.
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Exposure To Nanoparticles In Digestive System Affects Absorption Of Iron

March 8, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers have found that digestive exposure to nanoparticles of polystyrene influences the absorption of the important nutrient iron into the bloodstream. Nanoparticles are contained in many substances, from cosmetics and clothes, to soda and snacks. For brief exposures to polystyrene particles, iron absorption dropped by 50 percent. But when exposure to nanoparticles was significantly increased, absorption of iron increased by about 200 percent. “It was very clear,” the researchers concluded, “nanoparticles definitely affect iron uptake and transport." The researchers hope to test whether nanoparticles also disrupt absorption of calcium, copper and zinc, as well as fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K.
Gretchen J. Mahler et al., "Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles affects iron absorption", Nature Nanotechnology, March 08, 2012, © Nature Publishing Group
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Digital And Social Media Transform The Way Americans Plan, Prepare And Eat Their Meals

March 7, 2012: 12:54 AM EST
There has been a sea change in recent years in the way Americans buy food and plan, prepare and even eat their meals, thanks to the Internet and the rise of social media, according to a report from Publicis Consultants USA that also offers some insights for brand marketers. People rely much less on “mom and family traditions” for recipes. Half of consumers now get recipes and culinary advice from Web sites, apps, and blogs; 40 percent use Twitter and Facebook. More people – especially Millennials (18-32 years old) – share their dining experiences by texting friends or posting commentary on review sites as they eat. Marketers developing social media campaigns should create long-term, personal relationships with consumers, a strategy that succeeded for whole grain bread company Roman Meal.
"Publicis Consultants USA Study: Americans Learning More About Food Scene, Trends Via Social Media", Newsedge, March 07, 2012, © ProQuest Information and Learning Company
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Researcher Finds No Evidence That Weight Loss Supplements Are Effective

March 6, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. researcher who analyzed data from a variety of weight loss studies has concluded that no evidence exists that any single product results in significant weight loss, and many can be harmful. The researcher looked at studies involving four main categories of products: chitosan, which block absorption of fat or carbs; stimulants such as caffeine or ephedra that increase metabolism; products such as conjugated linoleic acid that claim to decrease body fat; and appetite suppressants such as soluble fibers. “For most people, unless you alter your diet and get daily exercise, no supplement is going to have a big impact,” the researcher said.
Melinda M. Manore, "Dietary Supplements for Improving Body Composition and Reducing Body Weight: Where is the evidence?", International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, March 06, 2012, © Human Kinetics, Inc.
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Vitamin D – But Not Calcium – Lowers Risk Of Stress Fracture Among Young Girls

March 5, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A seven-year U.S. study of preadolescent and adolescent girls has discovered a link between vitamin D intake levels and a lower risk of developing stress fractures, especially among girls active in high-impact activities. The researchers found no lessening of stress fracture risk linked with calcium intake, however, despite that fact that consumption of calcium and calcium-rich dairy products is routinely recommended for optimal bone health. They also noted that their findings support the Institute of Medicine's recent increase in the recommended dietary allowance for vitamin D for adolescents from 400 IU/d to 600 IU/d.
Kendrin R. Sonneville et al., "Vitamin D, Calcium, and Dairy Intakes and Stress Fractures Among Female Adolescents", Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, March 05, 2012, © American Medical Association
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Flavonoid In Dark Chocolate Improves Exercise Capabilities Of Heart Patients With Diabetes

March 2, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A clinical study involving five critically ill heart patients with diabetes found that treatment with a flavonoid (epicatechin) contained in dark chocolate improved cell mitochondrial structure and boosted the ability to exercise. Mitochondria are cell structures responsible for energy production. Both type 2 diabetes and heart failure make mitochondria dysfunctional, causing muscle abnormalities. Trial participants ate dark chocolate bars and a beverage with a total epicatechin content of 100 mg a day for three months. The positive results of the small trial provided enough evidence to launch a larger, placebo-controlled clinical trial at UC, San Diego.
Pam R. Taub et al., "Alterations in Skeletal Muscle Indicators of Mitochondrial Structure and Biogenesis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Heart Failure: Effects of Epicatechin Rich Cocoa", Clinical and Translational Science, March 02, 2012, © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Maintaining A Healthy Lifestyle From Twenties To Forties Leads To Healthier Middle Age

March 2, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Healthy people in their twenties who were able to maintain a healthy lifestyle into their forties – lean body mass index, moderate alcohol intake, no smoking, healthy diet and regular exercise – kept their risk of cardiovascular disease low in middle age, according to a U.S. study. Researchers analyzed 20 years of data on key lifestyle factors from more than 3,000 participants in a national study. In the first year of the study (1985, average age 24 years), 44 percent had a low cardiovascular disease risk profile. Twenty years later, only 24.5 percent fell into the low cardiovascular disease risk category. The increased risk of the others was due to unhealthy diets, weight gain, smoking, etc., all of which combined to increase blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes.
K. Liu et al., "Healthy Lifestyle Through Young Adulthood and the Presence of Low Cardiovascular Disease Risk Profile in Middle Age: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in (Young) Adults (CARDIA) Study", Circulation, March 02, 2012, © American Heart Association, Inc.
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Balanced Diet May Be Key Strategy For Relieving Depressive Disorders

March 1, 2012: 08:39 AM EST
Recent research finds that poor dietary habits -- too much sugary, salty and fatty processed foods -- are at least partly responsible for mood disorders experienced by nine percent of Americans. British research found that a diet loaded with chocolates, sweet desserts, fried food, refined cereals and high-fat dairy increased the risk of depression among middle aged people, while a diet rich in whole foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fish  lowered the risk. Likewise, processed foods that contribute to inflammation are a risk factor for depression and may explain the link between cardiovascular disease and mood disorders. Eating a balanced diet -- grains, fruits, legumes, and starchy vegetables plus protein foods -- allows tryptophan, and the “feel good” chemical serotonin, to get into the brain, elevating one’s mood.
"Boost mood with whole foods", Environmental Nutrition, March 01, 2012, © Belvoir Media Group, LLC
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Behavior Problems Improve When Autistic Children Adhere To Gluten-Free, Casein-Free Diet

February 29, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Autistic children may experience improvements in social behavior and physiological symptoms if they stick to a gluten-free, casein-free diet, U.S. researchers have found. Gluten and casein are both proteins, the former found in wheat flour and the latter in cow’s milk. For the study, 387 parents of autistic children reported on how much gluten and casein their kids consumed. The researchers found that a gluten-free, casein-free diet among children with gastrointestinal and  allergy problems was effective in improving social behaviors, such as language production, eye contact, engagement, attention span, requesting behavior and social responsiveness.
Pennesi, Christine M. & Klein, Laura Cousino, "Effectiveness of the gluten-free, casein-free diet for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder: Based on parental report", Nutritional Neuroscience, February 29, 2012, © Maney Publishing
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Elderly Brains Age Faster When Diets Are Lower In Omega-3 Fatty Acids

February 27, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study of 1,575 dementia-free people whose average age was 67 found that those with lower levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood had lower brain volumes – equivalent to about two years worth of structural brain aging. Those whose omega-3 levels were among the bottom 25 percent of participants had lower brain volume compared to those who had higher omega-3 levels. In addition, those with the lowest levels of omega-3s also scored lower on tests of visual memory and executive function, such as problem solving, multi-tasking and abstract thinking.
Z. S. Tan et al., "Red blood cell omega-3 fatty acid levels and markers of accelerated brain aging", Neurology, February 27, 2012, © AAN Enterprises, Inc.
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Citrus Flavanones Lower Risk Of Stroke In Women

February 23, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
British researchers who analyzed 14 years of data from a nurses study found that those who consumed the highest amounts of compounds known as flavanones – found in citrus fruits – significantly lowered their risk of stroke. The study included 69,622 women who reported their food intake, including details on fruit and vegetable consumption, every four years. Consumption of six main subclasses of flavonoids commonly consumed in the U.S. diet – flavanones, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, flavonoid polymers, flavonols and flavones – was tracked along with incidents of ischemic, hemorrhagic and total stroke. They found that women who ate high amounts of flavanones in citrus had a 19 percent lower risk of blood clot-related (ischemic) stroke than women who consumed the least amounts.
Aedín Cassidy et al., "Dietary Flavonoids and Risk of Stroke in Women", Stroke, February 23, 2012, © American Heart Association, Inc.
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Fructose Is Not Necessarily The Culprit In Weight Gain, Study Finds

February 21, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A study by Canadian scientists who reviewed findings from more than 40 scientific articles found that over-consumption of calories – no matter what their source – was the culprit in weight gain. The researchers specifically noted that eating fructose, a sugar found naturally in fruits, vegetables and honey, was not itself to blame for weight gain in any of the studies. People who consumed fructose were no more likely to gain weight than those who ate other forms of carbohydrates. “Overconsumption is the issue,” the researchers said. The study did not look at the much disparaged food sweetener high fructose corn syrup, which is 45 percent glucose and water, 55 percent fructose.
John L. Sievenpiper et al., "Effect of Fructose on Body Weight in Controlled Feeding Trials A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis", Annals of Internal Medicine, February 21, 2012, © American College of Physicians
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Devotees Of Gluten-Free Lifestyle Unmoved By Nutritionists’ Advice

February 16, 2012: 07:49 PM EST
According to market researchers, fewer than ten percent of U.S. consumers are allergic to the protein gluten, found in wheat, barley and rye. Only one percent suffer from celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder marked by a serious digestive reaction to gluten. Yet 25 percent of consumers have sworn off gluten – thanks to hype from marketers and celebrities – creating a $6 billion a year market. Nutritionists say avoiding gluten is not harmful to people without celiac disease, but it is a waste of money. If a person doesn’t have celiac disease and isn’t gluten-sensitive, they say, go ahead and eat that bread. But that advice does not convince those without gluten sensitivity or celiac disease who swear their gluten-free diet has changed their lives.
Jill Rosen, "Is going gluten-free good for you?", The Baltimore Sun, February 16, 2012, © Tribune Interactive, Inc.
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Elderly People Who Consume More Calories Daily Have Twice The Risk Of Cognitive Impairment

February 13, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A U.S. study has discovered a close correlation between the number of calories consumed by people age 70 and older and the risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI): the higher the amount of caloric intake each day, the greater the risk. For the study, 1,233 people between the ages of 70 and 89 without dementia – though 163 had MCI – kept track of the calories they consumed from food and drink each day. They were divided into three groups, based on their caloric intake. Researchers found that the odds of having MCI more than doubled in the group that consumed between 2,143 and 6,000 calories a day.
Ronald C. Petersen, M.D. et al., "Caloric Intake, Aging, and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Population-Based Study", Presentation, American Academy of Neurology (AAN) meeting, February 13, 2012, © American Academy of Neurology
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“Baby-Led” Weaning Helps Children Learn To Make Healthier Food Choices

February 9, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Researchers in the U.K. have found that how a baby is weaned – using either pureed or baby-chosen finger foods – can influence food choices and health later in life. When babies get to choose solid finger food, they are more likely to pick healthier foods to eat as they mature and less likely to become overweight than children spoon-fed pureed food. For the study, researchers analyzed data from 154 children. Some had been allowed to eat solid finger food during the weaning process, the rest had been spoon-fed purees. “Baby-led” weaning had a positive impact on the preference for healthier, more nutritious foods. The method “promotes healthy food preferences in early childhood which may protect against obesity," the researchers concluded.
E. Townsend & N. J. Pitchford, "Baby knows best? The impact of weaning style on food preferences and body mass index in early childhood in a case-controlled sample", BMJ Open, February 09, 2012, © Townsend et al.
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CDC Finds That Bread And Rolls Are The Major Source Of Sodium In The American Diet

February 7, 2012: 07:10 PM EST
A Center for Disease Control report on dietary sodium says bread and rolls – not salty snacks – are the number one source of salt in the U.S. diet. CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden said snack foods like potato chips, pretzels and popcorn rank only at No. 10 on CDC’s list of top sodium sources. The CDC was careful to clarify that bread and rolls aren’t themselves loaded with salt: but people tend to eat a lot more of them. The top 10 list accounts for 44 percent of the sodium in the American diet. Bread and rolls provide about seven percent of the salt, followed by cold cuts and cured meats, pizza, fresh and processed poultry, soups, fast-food hamburgers and sandwiches, and cheese.
Mike Stobbe, "CDC: Bread beats out chips as biggest salt source", News feature via Google, February 07, 2012, via Google, © The Associated Press
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Walmart Spotlights Its Healthy Food Products With New “Great For You” Label

February 7, 2012: 08:17 PM EST
A “Great For You” label will begin to appear this spring on Walmart food products that meet the company's newly developed standards for healthiness and nutrition. The bright green labels, part of a recent commitment to boost the nutritional quality of the foods it sells, will appear on its Great Value and Marketside food lines. The labels will also be displayed on signs in the fresh fruit and vegetable sections of stores. The company will allow use of the label – without requiring a licensing fee – by non-store brands, as long as products meet the company’s nutritional standards.
Stephanie Strom, "Walmart to Label Healthy Foods", The New York Times, February 07, 2012, © The New York Times Company
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Many Fast-Food Diners Would Rather Choose Smaller Portions Than Heed Calorie Data

February 8, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Fast-food diners would rather get smaller portions in their restaurant meals than read – and heed – calories postings, according to the U.S. study. When servers asked whether customers would like to “downsize” starchy side dishes at a Chinese fast-food restaurant 33 percent gladly cut back, saving an average 200 calories each meal. The offer of a discount on the down-sized meal had virtually no impact on the decision about smaller portions. The researchers said they hoped the study would help restaurants understand that helping diners exercise portion control won’t alienate customers, a finding that may be “counterintuitive.” It is “an interesting and easy strategy to implement that could help their customers make healthier choices,” they said.
Janet Schwartz et al., "Inviting Consumers To Downsize Fast-Food Portions Significantly Reduces Calorie Consumption", Health Affairs, February 08, 2012, © Project HOPE
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Want To Lose Weight? Eat Dessert At Breakfast

February 7, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Israeli researchers report that desserts – cookies, cake or chocolate – eaten as part of a 600-calorie breakfast that also includes proteins and carbohydrates can actually help dieters lose more weight. For the 32-week study, 193 clinically obese, non-diabetic dieters were divided into two groups, one of which ate a 300-calorie breakfast and the other a 600-calorie breakfast that included dessert. Those who ate the breakfast dessert lost an average of 40  pounds more than those who avoided such foods. And they kept the pounds off longer. The key to the weight loss is eating the desserts in the morning when the body’s metabolism is most active and extra calories can be worked off during the day, researchers say.
Daniela Jakubowicz et al., "Meal timing and composition influence ghrelin levels, appetite scores and weight loss maintenance in overweight and obese adults", Steroids, February 07, 2012, © Elsevier Inc.
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Selling Raw Milk Puts Farmers – And The Public – At Considerable Risk

February 6, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Though selling unpasteurized, raw milk can save farmers money, it can also put their livelihoods – and the general public – in jeopardy, thanks to the dangers of bacterial contamination, according to researchers at Cornell University who testified before a New Jersey legislative committee. The researchers cited a $2.4 lawsuit in Washington that resulted from raw milk illness that may be traceable to a dairy farm. And 35 people in four states became sick recently after drinking unpasteurized raw milk. The researchers called pasteurization a” proven public health mechanism” that can prevent the health, and legal, problems associated with selling and drinking raw milk.
Rob Ralyea, "Raw Milk Is a Dangerous Raw Deal for Farmers and Consumers, Experts Say", News release, testimony, N.J. State Assembly, Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee, February 06, 2012, © Cornell University
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U.S. Hotels Board The Gluten-Free Bandwagon

February 5, 2012: 07:40 PM EST
With the growing awareness of the potential harm to people with a digestive sensitivity to gluten – the protein found in wheat, barley and rye – U.S. hotels have begun to modify their menus to cater to gluten-averse customers. The USA TODAY report notes that Kimpton’s Hotel Palomar (San Francisco), Fairmont Hotels, Omni Hotels, Marriott International and Washington’s Ritz-Carlton have all begun offering gluten-free fare in their facilities, from room service to minibars to buffets. The changes make for good marketing, say hoteliers: "This is a subtle message that we are attentive to health issues," says the dean of NYU's Center for Hospitality, Tourism and Sports Management.
Nancy Trejos, "Hotels cater to special diets; gluten-free food now on menus", USA TODAY, February 05, 2012, © USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co. Inc.
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Genetic Differences Explain Preference For Unhealthy Fatty Foods

February 3, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
People who have some forms of a certain gene tend to prefer higher fat foods – half-and-half, sour cream, mayonnaise, bacon, fried chicken, etc. – putting them at greater risk for obesity compared to those without the gene, a U.S. study involving African Americans has found. The gene, CD36, is necessary in animals to both detect and develop preferences for fat. According to the researchers, their discovery helps explain why some people resist a low-fat diet and may one day assist people in selecting diets that are easier to follow. Food formulators might also use the new insight to develop better tasting low-fat foods.
Kathleen L. Keller et al., "Common Variants in the CD36 Gene Are Associated With Oral Fat Perception, Fat Preferences, and Obesity in African Americans", Obesity, February 03, 2012, © The Obesity Society
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Vitamin/Mineral Supplements Significantly Reduce Risk Of Colon Cancer In High-Fat Diet

February 3, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A study by Indian and Saudi scientists has found that lab animals fed a high-fat/low-fiber diet plus daily vitamin/mineral supplements developed 84 percent fewer precancerous colon lesions. In addition, unlike the animals fed the same diet without a vitamin/mineral supplement, the vitamin-fed animals developed no cancerous colon tumors. The authors concluded that multivitamin and mineral supplements together “contribute to the cancer chemopreventative potential” and “regular supplements of multivitamins and minerals could reduce the risk of colon cancer."
Albert Baskar Arul et al., "Multivitamin and mineral supplementation in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced experimental colon carcinogenesis and evaluation of free radical status, antioxidant potential, and incidence of ACF", Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, February 03, 2012, © Canadian Science Publishing
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Study Finds That People Mimic Eating Behavior Of Dining Partners, For Better Or Worse

February 2, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
Dutch and Canadian researchers have determined that eating behaviors – both positive and negative – can be influenced by the behavior of dining partners. Seventy female students participated in the study, dining in an imitation restaurant with a female companion whom they had not met before. Both women in every couple tended to synchronize their bites with their eating companion rather than eating at their own pace. The subconscious mimicry behavior is a way to make an impression or ingratiate yourself, particularly when just becoming acquainted, the researchers said. The finding could be used in the war against obesity: eating behavior can be influenced without people realizing it, and that knowledge could help change harmful eating patterns.
Roel C. J. Hermans et al., "Mimicry of Food Intake: The Dynamic Interplay between Eating Companions", PLoS ONE, February 02, 2012, © Hermans et al.
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Shedding Light On Resveratrol’s Biochemistry May Lead To Effective Medicines

February 2, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
A discovery about the biochemistry and cell targeting mechanism of resveratrol may lead to the development of resveratrol-based medicines for combating diabetes, inflammation, Alzheimer’s and cancer,U.S. researchers report. Resveratrol, a naturally occurring chemical found in red wine and other plant products, does not directly activate sirtuin 1, a protein associated with aging. Instead, the compound inhibits certain types of proteins known as phosphodiesterases (PDEs), enzymes that help regulate cell energy. Prior research has shown that about one gram of resveratrol a day, roughly equal to the amount found in 667 bottles of red wine, is needed to confer any major health benefits.
Sung-Jun Park et al., "Resveratrol Ameliorates Aging-Related Metabolic Phenotypes by Inhibiting cAMP Phosphodiesterases", Cell, February 02, 2012, © Elsevier, Inc.
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Coffee Drinkers Are Less At Risk Of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

February 2, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers who studied the correlation between coffee consumption and the severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease confirmed that coffee caffeine cuts the risk of advanced fibrosis. The study involved 306 participants who were asked about their  caffeine coffee habits and were categorized into four groups, each with varying severities of fatty liver, from none to stage four. Analysis showed that the higher the consumption of coffee caffeine, the lower the risk of  hepatic fibrosis. The researchers said that "patients with [fatty liver disease] may benefit from moderate coffee consumption that decreases risk of advanced fibrosis.”
Jeffrey W. Molloy et al., "Association of coffee and caffeine consumption with fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and degree of hepatic fibrosis", Hepatology, February 02, 2012, © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Eating Small Portions Of Purple Potatoes Reduces Blood Pressure In Overweight People

February 1, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers who investigated the effects of eating microwaved purples potatoes on blood pressure found that overweight people experienced an average drop of 4.3 percent in diastolic blood pressure and a 3.5 percent drop in systolic blood pressure over eight weeks. Eighteen volunteers ate 6-8 small microwaved purple potatoes (Purple Majesty) twice a day. Blood pressure dropped without weight gain, the researchers noted. The researchers said that the decrease seems small, but is enough to potentially reduce the risk of heart disease. The scientists acknowledged that they did not know what substances in the potatoes caused the drop in blood pressure, nor did they know whether white potatoes would have the same effect.
Joe A. Vinson et al., "High antioxidant potatoes: Acute in vivo antioxidant source and hypotensive agent in humans after supplementation to hypertensive subjects", Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, February 01, 2012, © American Chemical Society
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“Gentle” Controls On Sugar Consumption Would Help Fight Global Obesity Problem

February 1, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
In a world where obesity is contributing to 35 million deaths annually, researchers suggest that sugar’s potential for abuse, along with its toxicity and pervasiveness in the Western diet, make it a major offender. They argue that sugar is not just a source of empty calories: it changes metabolism, raises blood pressure, critically alters the signaling of hormones, and causes major damage to the liver. Sugar consumption should be controlled, not prohibited, using only “gentle ways to make sugar consumption slightly less convenient.” The gentle tactics they suggest include levying special sales taxes, controlling access, and tightening licensing requirements on vending machines and snack bars
Robert H. Lustig et al., "Public health: The toxic truth about sugar", Nature, February 01, 2012, © Nature Publishing Group
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Researchers Find Puzzling Link Between Daily Diet Soft Drink Consumption And Vascular Illness

January 31, 2012: 12:00 AM EST
U.S. researchers who studied ten years of health data from 2,564 participants in an urban stroke study, found that individuals who drink diet soft drinks every day had a 43 percent higher risk of stroke, heart attack and other cardiovascular events, including death. However, the researchers found no such correlation among moderate drinkers of diet soft drinks, or among drinkers of regular soft drinks. The researchers acknowledged they don’t know the reasons behind the higher vascular event correlation, but said their results "suggest a potential association between daily diet soft drink consumption and vascular outcomes” that needs further study.
Hannah Gardener et al., "Diet Soft Drink Consumption is Associated with an Increased Risk of Vascular Events in the Northern Manhattan Study", Journal of General Internal Medicine, January 31, 2012, © Springer
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